Jim Kennedy | Interview

by | Jul 28, 2023

Jim Kennedy

At SVGC we’re proud to be a small business formed of experienced, highly qualified people operating on a national platform. Our team collectively has vast knowledge of strategic planning, public sector decisions, innovative technologies, data science and agile working methodologies.

We’re pleased to welcome to the team Technical Project Manager, Jim Kennedy, who brings with him a wealth of knowledge and experience working within the public sector. Get to know him better …

What are your ‘must haves’ to start the working day? (tea, coffee, your dog, background music, podcast, favourite pen/notebook etc etc)

Every day starts by grabbing some fresh air with my wife when we take our dog (Bella, a red fox Labrador) for a walk around the local fields. Then, once back at home, it’s time to put the kettle on for the first cup of Twinings STRONG English Breakfast tea.

What’s your proudest work achievement to date?

It would be hard to pick just one work achievement, but for several years now I’ve been lucky enough to work on many key Public Sector project deliveries. In my own opinion, I don’t think there are many areas you can work in where you see the results, and feel the impact, more than those which are public facing services.

What do you love most about what you do?

Working in a collaborative and supportive team structure, attacking tasks while troubleshooting any problems that come up along the way, with focus on delivering transformative digital/technological changes and solutions for the customer.

What does your typical working day look like?

For SVGC specifically this is a hard question to answer so early on. Generally, though – as a Project Manager – it’s usually a healthy mix of progress meetings, stakeholder management, spreadsheets/trackers, change management/scheduling, document creation & review, finance management and many slide decks, alongside the overarching governance and reporting.

When you hit a wall workwise, what do you do to help overcome the hurdle?

The answer to this would usually be based on two criteria: “how urgent is it?” and “how big is the task?”. Depending on those two criteria, the solution could be anything from “think-dreaming” (daydreaming with a purpose!) out of the office window, making a cup of tea and taking five minutes to think it through, taking the dog for a 10 minute walk to clear the mind, asking a colleague their thoughts on the matter, creating a RACI or, where priorities/deadlines allow, leaving it until the next day to attack it with fresh eyes.

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